1 / 1

Yung Lean

May 10/2016
WORDS Ian McWilfred PHOTOGRAPHY Matt Barnes

Staying true to one’s original narratives can be tricky in a game that constantly threatens to change you for everything you are. Stockholm’s Yung Lean has gone from being a somewhat obscure underground figure to a burgeoning global star in a matter of a few years. Bursting onto the rap scene with his Sad Boys in 2013, the last three years have seen a deep period of strife and personal development. Sitting down with Yung Lean, we talked about his influences, growing up, fame and staying true.

YUNG-LEAN3046

The 19-year-old star is no stranger to the lifestyle that seems to compel youths to express themselves through rapping. “I grew up in Belarus, in Russia, but spent most of my time in Stockholm. Stockholm is kind of  crazy. I went to normal public schools – a lot of bad kids and a lot of hooligans.” Lean characterizes his transformation from high school to a three year period of running around the world as just a progression of life. “It’s nice, it’s fine. It doesn’t make any sense, really, but I guess you can really do anything if you put your mind to it. Like, I worked at McDonald’s and I tried to be the best at it. But I wasn’t the best, so I went on to rapping.”

Well acquainted with fame at this point, Lean reflects: “I don’t love the fame, I love making music and hanging out with my friends, like on the tour bus. But I don’t really like people taking photos or stuff like that. I don’t fuck with that. My life’s the same – I just have more money for clothes.”

If you’re a fan of the Sad Boys sound, you’ll realize that on the Warlord record there is definitely a show of introspection on tracks like “Eye Contact” and “Highway Patrol”.  “Life sort of hit me,” explains Lean. “My manager died. I went to the hospital for a drug overdose. A lot of stuff happened. While recording Warlord a lot of things went down, so I grew as a person.” Regardless of this, the sound stays true to the roots. Lean says the consistency comes down to having the same people around. “Ever since I was 16, I worked with Sherman, White Armor and Gud. I’m still working with the same people. So the only person that’s really new is Mike Dean, but he’s only on two songs. It’s always about hanging out and working with the same people you grew up with and started making music with. You can hear with some people – they’re real when they start out but when they’re famous, they just get fake. It’s not like that if you keep the same people around you.”

It’s fun to have haters. They need something to do. They donít have enough positivity in their life. They need someone to hate. So I don’t care about them.

Lean draws influences from various sources that range from southern heavy bass trap to some weird pop, and is no stranger to varying critical reception. Undeterred by his critics, Lean welcomes the hate. “It’s fun to have haters. They need something to do. They’re just filled with hate,” he says with a chuckle. “They don’t have enough positivity in their life. They need someone to hate. So I don’t care about them.”

  Allie X began with a vision: of a blank slate. The multimedia electronic pop artist chose the letter “X” to signify infinite possibility – an attempt to strip herself of any pre-existing identity. Yet she feels the presence of multiple versions of herself: good ones, bad ones, and everything in between. “I think I’ve always had this self-awareness of the bad parts of myself,” she reflects. “I remember feeling as a kid like I hadn’t suffered enough, which is kind of a strange feeling. And then I remember in middle school feeling like I wasn’t being nice enough to people.” Her self-awareness has only expanded with age: “As I’ve gotten older, sometimes I just feel like I’m watching myself from somewhere else and think, ‘Who is this person?… Who am I, and is it good or bad?’” Unsure of who she is, anything does seem possible. The cover of Allie X’s latest album and full-length debut, CollXtion II, features her literally reassembling herself, slotting cubed pieces of her shin back into her leg. The visual perfectly captures what The Story of X, the name she has given the narrative that arches across all of her creative output as Allie

MORE

In her role as Valerie Brown on Riverdale, Hayley Law is one of the show’s most charismatic characters, standing confidently behind the keyboards as one fourth of Josie and the Pussycats. In real life, outside of acting, Law is a burgeoning recording artist who makes playful pop and soul-inflected music under the stage name Hayleau (pronounced Halo). In November of last year she dropped her first self-titled EP, and since then the 24-year-old, who’s based in Vancouver, has been working on her sophomore release in between filming two huge Netflix series. We spoke with Law about being Hayleau, her creative catharsis, and of coarse, Riverdale.  G—You’ve had an impressive start to 2017. How has your life changed in the last year? HL—It’s changed a lot. A year ago I was working at a job that I hated, serving at a breakfast restaurant. Now I get to do something that I have been working so hard to do, every day. I’m so thankful I don’t have to do what I was doing to get to where I am now. G—Parallel to your role as Valerie on Riverdale  you have a blossoming music career. Could you tell us a bit about your

MORE

FLETCHER

Millennials — a generation the mainstream media loves to tarnish as entitled, lazy and self-absorbed. But stereotypes like these fail to speak to the extensive research that proves millennials are driven by much more than a desire to capture the perfect selfie — in fact, on the whole, they’re well educated, civic-oriented, progressive and incredibly entrepreneurial. Look no further than 23-year old Cari Fletcher, otherwise known as FLETCHER. A self-described “power pop” artist, she represents the kind of fearlessness, unbridled ambition, self-determination and desire to change the world that has catapulted so many millennials to success. Ever since “War Paint” was included as part of Spotify’s Spotlight on 2016 list — a song she wrote and self-published online while studying at NYU — Fletcher has become a viral sensation. “War Paint” has amassed over 19 million Spotify listens to date, and the video for “Wasted Youth” — from her debut EP, Finding Fletcher — has already racked up 1.3 million views since being released in March 2017. Even more impressive than her level of notoriety is the absence of a major label to credit for her success. Instead, hard work, honesty, and an entrepreneurial approach — and irrefutable talent, of course —

MORE