CULTURE

MAGAZINE FEATURE

Uzo Aduba

Arguably one of the biggest breakout stars of the hugely popular Netflix original series, Orange is the New Black, Emmy award-winning Uzo Aduba has become a favourite among fans and critics alike for her portrayal as Suzanne, a.k.a. “Crazy Eyes”. Georgie had the pleasure of speaking with Aduba about the lessons she’s learned from being on the show and the freedom that comes with playing Suzanne. G—Season three of Orange is the New Black is starting soon, how are you feeling about that? Excited, nervous? UA—I always get nervous — I’m that actor. And I can’t ever not be nervous. I get nervous no matter what, whether I have a play or a show to premiere. My cast mates will tell you that I’m definitely not the one you want to talk to before a release. [Laughs] G—What makes you so nervous? Are you worried about how it will be received? UA— All of it! I mean, I think it’s that and also it’s how my investment manifests itself. But yeah, I do get nervous. I want the work to be good—for everyone. G—I’m sure it will be, judging by some of the previews I’ve seen. Speaking of which, in

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David Suzuki

There is no denying the urgency in Canadian writer Shane Koyzcan’s poem “Shoulders” when he asks: “How do we save the world? We lay in our beds, curled into question mark, wondering what can we do? Where do we start? Is hope a glue crazy enough to hold us together while we’re falling apart?” Sitting transfixed in Edmonton’s Winspear Centre is a sold-out Blue Dot Tour audience eager to hear the answers to these questions. David Suzuki, the preeminent scientist, activist, and host of CBC’s The Nature of Things, is calling upon ordinary citizens to support an amendment to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms to include the right to a healthy environment. What Suzuki is proposing isn’t something new or audacious. More than 110 countries have incorporated environmental rights and responsibilities into their constitutions. Canada is an “international laggard” on this front, according to environmental lawyer David R. Boyd, a leading voice advocating for the explicit inclusion of environmental rights in Canada’s constitution. The coast-to-coast Blue Dot Tour is part spectacle and part rally. It gathers a myriad of musicians, local leaders, Aboriginal Elders, and other well-known Canadians such as Koyzcan who lend their voices to spread the

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What started in an airplane hanger has now become something of an annual pilgrimage for music lovers seeking one of most diverse festivals in the world. Iceland Airwaves 2015 served up an array of both established and emerging hip-hop, rock, indie and electronic music. Even larger than last year, the festivities were stretched over five days, November 4th-8th with over 240 acts appearing in over 50 official/unofficial-venue sites across the long weekend. From hostels and record stores to the Reykjavík Art Museum, the majority of public spaces were transformed into a stage. The opening night was something of an Icelandic showcase, as Reykjavíkurdaetur (translation Reykjavík’s Daughter) unleashed it’s 13 piece all girl hip-hop collective earning rousing responses with an explosive set at NASA. Dressed in nude body suit’s the girls took turns passing the mics to trade verses and deliver hard choruses shouted in Icelandic. Much kike SXSW, bands take the opportunity to play several shows over the course of the festival. Milkywhale (formed by choreographer Melkorka Sigríður Magnúsdóttir and musician Árni Hlöðversson of FM Belfast) had a string of sets including the festival’s opening at the very packed Laundromat Cafe. The post-pop duo are Iceland’s equivalent of a slightly

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We’ve all seen the bumper stickers – the line of rainbow coloured, collared bears dancing along the back of some asthmatic old car on its way to a festival. Beyond the bears, we’ve delighted in the genius ice cream flavour that is “Cherry Garcia,” or thought that wearing a wreath of red roses would be the perfect accessory to a rock show. The almost cult-like status of The Grateful Dead is so prevalent, so omnipresent, so engrained into our society that many people don’t even realize what the tie-dyed, trippy references harken back to. Which is a shame. Their music was innovative and spoke for a generation of young souls who couldn’t explain what escape they needed until they heard it booming out of a speaker during an acid trip. The idea of the Grateful Dead has somewhat taken over the music of the Grateful Dead for subsequent generations. Director Mike Fleiss has successfully managed to bring it back to the music with his new documentary The Other One. He lets the story of the band be told first-hand through the oft-overshadowed Bob Weir (lead singer, rhythm guitarist and writer) as well as 30 years worth of archive and interviews.

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“I was born in a difficult time,” says Emmanuel Jal. He was also born in a difficult place. Emmanuel Jal was born in South Sudan in 1980. A civil war broke out in 1983, with the fighting continuing until 2011. The decades-long conflict culminated in the division of the former country of Sudan into two new countries – North Sudan and South Sudan. During this span of time, 2,000,000 people died from the civil war and famine. Millions more were displaced from their homes. Jal’s earliest memories are of war. “I experienced war as a child. The situation was violent, running from one place to another and then arriving in Ethiopia, where I became a child soldier,” says Jal, recounting his childhood. His father joined the Sudan People’s Liberation Army to fight for the independence of Southern Sudan. When Jal was seven years old, his mother was killed in the fighting. Jal spent the next few years fighting in the war as a child soldier, a rebel against government forces. “We had a government that wanted to clear all [South Sudanese]. They promoted specific ethnic groups and specific faiths – so basically pro Islam – to try and make the

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The popular adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” refers to the notion that a single still image can represent a complex idea.  Images have proven to be powerful tools in driving political and social change, perhaps because images have no language barriers or intelligence limits. Kasper Nybo, an independent humanitarian photographer from Denmark, has dedicated his life to capturing world events through images. Immersing himself in events such as the 2010 Tsunami aftermath in Japan and the Haiti earthquake, Nybo has been able to successfully capture images that raise awareness, as well as funding to different organizations around the world.  Working internationally as a graphic designer and freelance photographer for over ten years, in 2010 Nybo decided to channel his skills into something more fulfilling. “Being in marketing for a while, I was basically making rich guys richer,” says Nybo. “And there’s nothing wrong with that in itself, but I wanted something more, something different. Living in a Western country can make us very shortsighted, and I don’t like this. I needed to broaden my horizon, not in a ‘save the world’ kind of way, but in a structured, honest and simple way.” Seeing photography as the platform

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Within a few minutes of talking to 23-year-old cinematographer Evan Prosofsky, it becomes clear that he’s a genuine and appreciative talent. He’s shot music videos for artists such as Toro y Moi, Grizzly Bear Grimes and Cadence Weapon, but he’s flattered by all the attention he’s been receiving and modest about his work. Perhaps it’s because he’s Canadian, or maybe it’s because of his typical childhood, growing up in Edmonton. Prosofsky attributes part of his early success to luck. After he moved to Montreal in 2010, he was asked to be the director of photography for a music video that director Emily Kai Bock, a close friend of his, was putting together. That video was “Oblivion” for Canadian artist Grimes and it’s since been viewed over five million times on YouTube. “We had a big celebratory dinner the night it got a million views,” laughs Prosofsky. Although it turned out to be one of the defining music moments in 2012, the popularity of “Oblivion” was completely unexpected. “I wasn’t enmeshed in that scene just yet. We were kind of naive. We never expected any of it.” He readily admits that having a break out video was instrumental in setting out

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If you follow Canadian independent music, you’ve probably seen the work of Montreal-based photographer and cinematographer Christophe Collette. He has provided the visual accompaniment to music by an incredible array of Canadian talent including Arcade Fire, Islands, and Coeur de Pirate. In addition to his music videos, Collette is a prodigious creator of artistic short films, fashion photography, and commercial spots (even if, God forbid, art and music aren’t your thing, you’ve likely seen Collette’s advertisements for Kraft, Home Depot, or Dell). Now Collette is preparing for the release of his first feature film, Brick Mansions, an action movie by first-time director Camille Delamarre, starring RZA from the Wu-Tang Clan, among others. (Brick Mansions is the American remake of Luc Besson’s District 13). Collette’s visual style is both nostalgic and forward-looking. His short films and music videos often combine older cinematic techniques like stop-motion animation with contemporary digital effects, and it’s often hard to determine where the old tricks end and the new ones begin. “I am very much interested in both older techniques and the cutting edge ones, but I often find myself seeking inspiration in films and photography from the early 1900s. I try never to copy but

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