Tinashe

Tinashe

  “I’ve never seen it snow while sunny,” Tinashe says as she looks out the window of the Phoenix Concert Theater during the Toronto stop of her Joyride tour. After completing a set of video...

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Christina Milian

Actress, singer, entrepreneur and reality TV star, Christina Milian first tore up the charts in the early 2000s with songs like like “AM to PM” and “Dip it Low”. But in 2016, she wears many hats. Today, the “mom” hat takes precedence. She’ll have to drop off her daughter Violet’s homework at school because they forgot it at home, she says, over the phone from L.A. It’s a gorgeous March day and Milian’s enjoying this brief home stint between rehearsing and shooting in Toronto for Kenny Ortega’s remake of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, in which she plays Magenta, a domestic. Ortega threw his net wide for his cast, finding performers from Britain, the U.S. and Canada. “I guess they couldn’t find a Magenta,” says Milian. “The dancers suggested to him that he should check me out. From there, I got a phone call asking if I would even be interested – I’ve always been a fan of Rocky Horror. After that, it was just talking about getting into this character, but [Ortega] was just really free about it and creative, and I got to come right on-board and start working on it directly. It’s been fun learning my character

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Kip Omolade

Kip Omolade is an American artist from Harlem, New York, with a background in graffiti art and a BFA from Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts. His latest series, Diovadiova Chrome, is a sequence of hyperrealistic oil paintings depicting massive chrome masks. Omolade casts these masks himself, which he then uses as a model for his paintings. The end result is a fascinating hybrid of African tradition and contemporary materials. We spoke to Omolade about Benin masks, Paris Hilton, and the meaning of chrome, “the poor man’s silver.”   G—In your series, Diovadiova Chrome, you explore immortality and contemporary notions of beauty and luxury. What prompted your interest in these themes? Kip Omolade—Paris Hilton. During the early phenomenon of reality TV stars, I became fascinated with the idea of the instant celebrity in mainstream media. I wondered if art could participate in this star-making machine. So, I ironically spent ten years developing the Diovadiova using one model as a muse. I drew, painted, printed and sculpted over 100 images of a single person. By confining myself to one model, Diovadiova also allowed me to stretch my imagination as an artist. I developed different styles including the current technique used in Diovadiova

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

G-Eazy

Bay Area-based hip hop artist G-Eazy – a.k.a. Gerald Earl Gillum – is riding a wave of success following the late 2015 release of his second album, When It’s Dark Out. The record spawned a hit – “Me, Myself & I” (featuring Bebe Rexha) – and an extensive world tour schedule to promote it. His rare off days have landed him in the studio, working on features for other artists, as was the case with a recent visit to Vancouver’s Warehouse Studios. “When you get a song that catches on, your phone starts blowing up.” G—Have you enjoyed making time to get into the studio during this tour? G-Eazy—It’s nice to get out of the routine of tour. The studio’s where I can get lost and find peace. It’s just hard to find the time. G—How have you dealt with the new level of success you have reached recently? GE—Nothing can prepare you for how busy it gets. It’s life-changing; but it’s not all bad. I’m about to help my mom buy a house. She’s never had that in her life. That’s one of my biggest motivators – to help take care of her. G—I read about her being at

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Bobby

  Bobby by Bautista STYLING Willyum Beck PHOTOGRAPHY Jared Bautista HAIR & MAKEUP Nickol Walkemeyer MODEL Bobby Rake PHOTO RETOUCHING Ivan Iglesias

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There’s only a handful of black models that have hit the runways and become household names in the West, but Stacey McKenzie is not just a black model – she’s a veteran Canadian supermodel who has upheld notions of beauty often ignored by the complex and sometimes monotone modeling industry. Beyond her tall, lean stature, McKenzie stands out with a crown of natural blonde curls and freckles. “When I started my career, it is true that there was only a handful of black models on the international scene in high fashion,” she says. “Transitioning into today, I do not see much of a change overall in the industry,” she carries on. “Because of my lighter skin complexion, freckles and natural blonde hair, there was no category that I fit into. It wasn’t until Jean Paul Gaultier booked me when I became a symbol of a new and very unique category, which ultimately led to my success.” However, regardless of her successes, the modeling playing field is still a jagged journey for models of colour. “When a designer such as Junya Watanabe chooses no black models for a collection based off varying African cultures, it doesn’t surprise me. Fashion is a

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