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The young UK producer duo that is giving a modern twist to garage influenced dance music....

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Young Magic

Aptly self-described as “gold dreamers, aspiring planet wanderers, silk sounders,” Brooklyn-based electronic music duo Young Magic revel in their own unique soundscape. Rhythmic electronic beats lay the foundation for light as air vocals that waft through the listener. Beginning as a solo project of Australian producer Isaac Emmanuel in New York in 2010 Young Magic expanded the following year with the addition of Indonesian vocalist Melati Malay. After releasing a series of 7” in 2011 the pair ambarked on their first world tour. Those not familiar with the band may still have unwittingly heard their music. Canadian band Purity Ring sampled Young Magic’s “You With Air” on their 2012 single, “Grandloves”, prompting a collaborative international tour later the same year. “It was amazing. A lot of fun,” says Malay. Both of Young Magic’s albums have been recorded in fragments in several countries across the globe. Their debut LP, Melt, was laid down in diverse locations such as Australia, North America, Europe and Central and South America. Released in February of 2012, Melt is an exuberant first offering from the pair with catchy rhythmic beats forcing a toe tap at first listen. The record has an unmistakable air of excitement. Bass

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Jen Mann

Jen Mann is creatively restless. “I don’t think anyone plans out how they will develop or change but things sort of happen and mature out of experiments and fun. At least that’s what has happened for me. I think that my work and ideas developed out of my own life and what is happening for me at the time that I am making them.” The Toronto-based artist studied printmaking at the Ontario College of Art and Design, but her current work focuses on large-scale oil portraits of friends and family. These paintings begin life as digital photos which Mann shoots herself. Despite the double layer of artistic mediation between the viewer and the subject, Mann’s paintings are remarkably intimate. You feel as if you know the subjects, and care about them. The intimacy in Mann’s work can be partly explained by the fact that she works with friends and family members instead of strangers or professional models, as well as her low-key approach to the initial photo sessions. “I think my process of shooting is sort of intimate and casual. There is a process of removing shirts, where the subject sort of reveals himself or herself. We then talk about

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

John James

“I’m a fourscore hell ride shredding a wave of whiskey into a bygone era where the ethical and cultural implications of standing tall atop an Everest of integrity wielding the ragged flag of authenticity wouldn’t give a raging mob cause to bring you to sacrificial slaughter.”   As the saying goes, if you looked up “artist” in the dictionary, John James’ picture would be staring back at you. She’s a natural, doer and creator, and she’d make Don Draper weak in the knees with her impressive professional portfolio of illustration, graphic design and creative direction. Originally from Edmonton, she’s got a sweet nine to five gig these days, working as Art Director at Vancouver advertising agency Noise Digital. James’ focused creativity has sat her at the table with some of the world’s most notable capitalist big boys including Nike, Absolut Vodka, Diesel and Mercedes Benz. Off the clock and under the virile pseudonym, John James, she designs and constructs custom jewelry of theatric proportions. “My pieces are meant to evoke the sense of a lover’s weight on your body,” she says. “As they are built to the personality and preference of the wearer, there is often interplay between comfort, discomfort,

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I’ve been doing James Brown since I was 14. Now, I’m going to do Charles Bradley. There’s a story in the Bible about a man who, while walking through a field, serendipitously stumbles onto something that would forever alter his life. What lay at his feet at that auspicious moment was nothing more than a vast amount of undiscovered treasure. One moment he’s walking, minding his own business, and the next, he’s staring at riches beyond his imagination. What’s his next move? Simple. Without hesitating, he sells all of his belongings in order to purchase that field. In other words, he trades his past for a better future.  Like that man, Charles Bradley knows all too well what it takes to seize the opportunity of a lifetime. The documentary Soul of America begins with shots of Charles Bradley getting ready for his gig as a James Brown impersonator known in New York as “Black Velvet”. The narration transposed over these scenes is a triumphant Bradley declaring in his raspy voice, “I’ve been doing James Brown since I was 14. Now, I’m going to do Charles Bradley.”  When I sat down to interview Charles, who was in Edmonton for the first

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As a listener — or consumer — of music, it seems that things have never been better. Anything and everything musical is accessible and immediate. The music comes in the form of a constant stream and musicians are closer to their fans than ever before. While it’s never been better for us, the opposite could perhaps be said for musicians. There are an extraordinary number of talented musicians that fight to be heard — or to be paid. Part of the fallout in this new landscape is the exhausting promotional treadmill that musicians must maintain to stay top-of-mind for listeners. Sometimes this seems to be more important than the music itself. Once you’ve caught a bit of the wave, just work your ass off to stay on the wave for as long as possible. It’s refreshing, then, to hear from someone who knows enough about himself that he doesn’t just know what to do, he also knows why he’s doing it. Jack Tatum of Wild Nothing seems to be one of those people. He’s out on the road with Wild Nothing right now, and what is he looking forward to most? Not doing Wild Nothing. “[After touring] I’m gonna bake

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The Betrayers

Betrayers are not party-poopers. Despite the title of their recently released debut album, Let the Good Times Die, singer and guitarist Travis Sargent insists the title is tongue-in-cheek. “It’s not the gloomiest album ever, but it isn’t exactly G ‘n R, y’know?” The band simply thought it was funny, thinking one could “throw on this record and bum all your friends out,” Sargent says. Even visually the album offers a paradox – a woman laughing vivaciously, dressed in vibrant colors, the style of print and font resembling a bastard sibling to The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds, in a world where the apple of Brian Wilson’s eye stomped on his heart instead of agreeing to a cruise in his Camaro. So what, if not gloom and doom, is the band’s M.O.?  According to Sargent, “We wanted to make a party album that was a bit darker and had a bit of desperation in there.” Start the party and kill it as well – a two-birds attack with fuzzy guitars and crunchy beats replacing the stone. And the attack plan is clearly working. Accompanying Sargent in the five-member band is bassist Justin Zawada, drummer(s) Joe Stagliano and Scarlet Welling-Yiannakoulias, and the easiest-spelled-last-name

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