Morgan Saint

Morgan Saint

  Morgan Saint was born into a creative life. Upon growing up in Mattituck, NY with a family of musicians on her mother’s side and parents who worked in interior design, Saint graduated from Pa...

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Derek Chadwick

Twenty-two-year-old model and aspiring actor Derek Chadwick is on the rise. In a millennial dream moment, he was discovered through his growing popularity on Instagram. Charming and unquestionably sexy, the young New Yorker embodies the essence of the perfect 90’s hunk. We spent the day with Derek in L.A. talking about his new career and his thoughts on the industry. G—How did you get started into modelling? DC—I’ve always also been in love with fashion. I started using Instagram as a platform to showcase clothing I really liked and then it sort of just kept growing organically from there. I got spotted via Instagram and I’ve been professional modeling for only a few months. G—What was your first modeling job? DC—Urban Outfitters. They reached out saying they had a campaign I would be perfect for and gave me the freedom to pick the clothing I wanted to wear. G—How would you describe your personal style? DC—90s vintage, I love pastels and faded denim. My personal style is always evolving. 2018 will have lots of different colors and feels. G—What do you do to stay in shape? DC—I do a lot of cardio, mainly sprints because it’s a good strong workout

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Paul Kaptein

At first glance, Paul Kaptein’s collection of hand-carved wooden sculptures might appear as though it was conceived in the deepest recesses of his unconscious mind. But in fact, his warped creations were born out of a very deliberate and conscious desire to depict an unstable realism – one that represents the dynamic relationship between form and emptiness. We spoke to Kaptein about his inspiration, the role of symbolism in his work and the relationship with his medium. G—Wood is a dominant medium in your work. What type of narrative do you think it creates? PK—I think it assumes a narrative that predates the work, and commences a commentary around time and timelessness. Wood has a universal presence that speaks to everything from wooden spoons and chopping boards, to alter prices, totems and architecture – it’s like the backbone of culture in a way. It acknowledges that change is an inherent part of the work – that it may one day become something else. For now it is sculpture. Hopefully. G—Much of your work is sculpture based. What are the advantages and limitations of sculpture? PK—I’m interested in being in the world and therefore tend to have a very visceral response

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

First Aid Kit

  In the ten years since Swedish sisters Klara and Johanna Söderberg started First Aid Kit, they have been going non-stop. The indie-folk duo got their start when their cover of Fleet Foxes’ “Tiger Mountain Peasant Song” went viral, and have since released four albums, won five Swedish Grammis awards, and brought two of their idols to tears on live television. Following a brief hiatus, and four years after their last record, Stay Gold, First Aid Kit is back with Ruins, a raw account of losing love and finding yourself. In the middle of a North American tour, Georgie talked to Klara and Johanna about the new album and what brought them to Ruins. G—You’ve said in past interviews that Stay Gold was a more put-together, polished kind of album, and Ruins is a lot rawer. What caused that shift? JS—The production of Stay Gold is very lush and elegant, and I think that’s what we wanted at the time. But we started longing for this rawness, this almost lo-fi aspect that we had on our first records. [For Ruins]…our attitude was that everything doesn’t have to be perfect. If we sing a bum note or there’s a little crack

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