Vince Staples

Vince Staples

“We all have things that we’re supposed to live up to that have nothing to do with us,” says Vince Staples. Even though he’s only 22 years old, it seems he knows a thing or two about outsi...

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Goldlink

  Shy, but bold. Eclectic, but tailored. Gifted, but still obstinate when it comes to his craft. These are a few of the characteristics that define DMV rapper and ‘future bounce’ artist GoldLink, leading him to the fork in the road between independent artist and soon-to-be household name. In just two years, GoldLink has embarked on a journey that took him from the shark tank of hip-hop upstarts to a coveted position on the 2015 XXL Freshman list, and finally to the attention of Rick Rubin, who executively produced his debut album, And After That, We Didn’t Talk. It’s like Montell Jordan’s ‘This Is How We Do It’ on crack… It’s the sound I’m bringing out of the DMV, one heavily influenced by go-go. Despite his quick rise to fame, when it comes to his music, GoldLink remains true to the path he wants to walk. “I started making music a little over two years ago because I was bored with the music that was coming out,” he explains. “Soulection connected with me on that – we collectively sought out other options this industry has to offer. ‘Future bounce’ was a term created by [Soulection’s] Lakim. It’s like Montell Jordan’s

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Juha Arvid Helminen

Since 2008 the Finnish photographer Juha Arvid Helminen has been exploring humanity’s literal and metaphorical dark side with a photo series entitled The Invisible Empire, which explores the ways in which power, authority, and violence express themselves through fashion and visual iconography. Helminen dresses his subjects in uniforms and accessories which suggest fascist and authoritarian political movements, conservative religion and contemporary policing. “I have always been fascinated by uniforms, and when I had studied arts and photography for a few years in 2008 I wanted to create photos with a meaning. To be honest, at first I was only intrigued by the aesthetics, but a bit later I started to think about human behaviour and how we convey different ideologies and professions by our clothes – how traditions and beliefs dictate our behaviour. How we hide our true persona and create walls around us.” This name, ‘Invisible Empire’, was on my mind for many years. Little by little just a few photographs grew into a whole narrative of humans’ incapability to learn from its mistakes throughout many centuries. The title, Invisible Empire, refers to an alternative name used by the Ku Klux Klan, an organization “known for violence, racism and

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Calvin Love

  Edmonton native, Calvin Love, is taking listeners along a journey of self-discovery with the recent release of Super Future – his first album under the esteemed indie label, Arts & Crafts, and his second to date. Featuring themes of love, loss, frustration and nostalgia, the album’s title befits its distinctly celestial sound – think dream-like synths and textured melodies underscored by funky bass lines and upbeat drums. Like 2012’s New Radar, Love wrote and recorded Super Future entirely by himself, only bringing in outside help for mixing. As a self-professed “control freak”, the solitary recording process is something that works well for Love. “I’ve played in bands before and I like collaborating, but I just kind of needed to prove to myself that I could do it all on my own – and it’s nice to be the only one calling the shots.” I’ve played in bands before and I like collaborating, but I just kind of needed to prove to myself that I could do it all on my own – and it’s nice to be the only one calling the shots. But despite the similar recording process, Super Future is a markedly more optimistic effort than New

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Stacey Mckenzie

There’s only a handful of black models that have hit the runways and become household names in the West, but Stacey McKenzie is not just a black model – she’s a veteran Canadian supermodel who has upheld notions of beauty often ignored by the complex and sometimes monotone modeling industry. Beyond her tall, lean stature, McKenzie stands out with a crown of natural blonde curls and freckles. “When I started my career, it is true that there was only a handful of black models on the international scene in high fashion,” she says. “Transitioning into today, I do not see much of a change overall in the industry,” she carries on. “Because of my lighter skin complexion, freckles and natural blonde hair, there was no category that I fit into. It wasn’t until Jean Paul Gaultier booked me when I became a symbol of a new and very unique category, which ultimately led to my success.” However, regardless of her successes, the modeling playing field is still a jagged journey for models of colour. “When a designer such as Junya Watanabe chooses no black models for a collection based off varying African cultures, it doesn’t surprise me. Fashion is a

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