Elliphant

Elliphant

  “I’m very chill,” says Ellinor Olovsdotter from her rented house in LA. “I’ve just been sitting here drinking coffee and smoking too many cigarettes and enjoying the beautiful weather...

1 / 1

MAGAZINE FEATURE

Yelle

Yelle is an exciting French band with burgeoning international acclaim. Recently signed to Dr. Luke’s Kemosabe label, they recorded their most recent album, Complètement Fou, in LA. We sat down with lead singer Julie Budet (known simply as “Yelle”) to chat about the band’s American tour and how, despite singing in French, they’re able to connect with a North American audience through whimsical tunes that incorporate art and fashion. Add to these admirable talents an irrepressible sense of fun and you have the best French export of the year. G—How’s the tour going so far? Julie Budet—Great. We just stopped a few days ago in, we stopped by Boston and then New York, Washington and Philadelphia. We’re just at the start of the tour but at the moment it’s really cool. We’ve had a good response from the crowd. G—How’s has America been treating you? JB—Really good actually. It’s weird because we are singing in French so it’s been a bit of a mystery how people connect to us. They don’t understand the lyrics but they are still enjoying the music, dancing and having fun at the show, so that’s cool. G—Do you feel any pressure to record in English

MORE

Romina Ressia

  Romina Ressia is an Argentinian-born photographer whose work is influenced by a lifelong appreciation for classical art and a fascination with modern-day behaviour. Driven to explore the ways in which the human disposition has evolved throughout the ages, she’s known for blending contemporary societal themes with Renaissance-style imagery. The end result is a portfolio of strikingly modern photos somehow also reminiscent of classic works of art. Georgie spoke to Ressia about her series, What Do You Hide?, which explores the human propensity to conceal certain aspects of our true identities in order to play a certain role, avoid judgement or meet others’ expectations. The subjects of these meticulously staged portraits have their faces camouflaged by vibrant, loudly patterned textiles, in what is a metaphorical visualization of the need to fit in – even if it means losing sight of who we really are.   G—Where did the idea for your What Do You Hide? series come from and what is the significance of camouflaging your subjects with mixed patterns? Romina Ressia—My ideas always come from the same place: society and the modern world. I love to analyze and represent how I see society nowadays…its behaviours. And, regarding camouflaging, I

MORE
1 / 1

MAGAZINE FEATURE

The Drums

Following a freewheeling debut record and the dark synth explorations of sophomore album Portamento, The Drums are back with Encyclopedia. We met up with Jonny Pierce and Jacob Graham in Montreal to talk about escapism, early electronic film soundtracks and their muscular new album. G—I associate The Drums with the Beach Boys, not just with the tone or the sound, but how it’s balanced with lyrical content that is not always upbeat. Occasionally, you hear things about water in the songs but I never really took that as a literal thing. To me, I saw it as a metaphor for losing or gaining idealism. Would you consider yourselves idealists? Jonny Pierce—I think we certainly, at the time we wrote those songs, would consider ourselves escapists. We were living in the middle of nowhere, in this small town in Florida called Kissimmee, and we were writing these songs and recording them. We were dirt poor. I had to ride my bike 20 miles each way to my job where I sold shoes. But we were also doing really sort of dreamy things. We found a little wooden canoe type boat and went down this little stream that was near our apartment

MORE

  On the cover of their new album, the members of Warpaint are superimposed over each other, coalescing together in a smoky haze designed by bassist Jenny Lee Lindberg’s husband, the director Chris Cunningham. Eponymously titled despite not being their first effort, there is a sense that Warpaint have come into their own since 2010’s The Fool, developing a refined sense of self-discovery after gaining drummer Stella Mozgawa and spending two and a half years touring between albums. I chatted with Warpaint’s Jenny Lee Lindberg and singer/guitarist Emily Kokal outside their tour bus in Montreal a few hours before they took the stage at the Corona Theatre. “The whole thing about self-titled and even I guess the album cover is that we are more of a complete unit with Stella and this is the first album that we’ve written with her,” explains Kokal. “From the ground up, from the very beginning so it was really new,” says Jenny Lee Lindberg. “She came in the band, she helped us record the album The Fool and then we went on tour but writing with her was put on hold, in the sense of making a new album, for those two and a

MORE

YACHT, sometimes stylized as Y∆CHT, and derived from Y.A.C.H.T., is an electro dance band out of Los Angeles. The stylistic variations of the band’s name are telling and meaningful. The first is associated with a carefree lifestyle – boating in the sun. And judging by Y∆CHT’s music, music videos and design language, this isn’t far off. With their cheerful melodies, and the vibrant colours and playful scenes captured in their videos,  Jona Bechtolt and Claire L. Evans, who front the band, seem to live a stereotypical life in California’s sunshine. However, unpacking the Y∆CHT acronym casts a political and critical shade on this idyllic picture. The acronym comes from an alternative school called Young Americans Challenging High Technology, which Bechtolt attended as a teenager. For a band that embraces and experiments with a wide variety of technology, it’s a genesis story that no longer fits. What it does convey is an ongoing underlying complexity. Bechtolt and Evans approach each song and album holistically, concerned not only with melodies and sound, but design, philosophy and occasional political activism. G—Your latest singles “Where Does the Disco?” and “Works like Magic” have a fresh new sound. Can you tell us a little about

MORE

Nathalia Pizarro

“You know, when a shark stops swimming it dies.” Nathalia Pizarro is talking about her incessant need to create. And as the charismatic frontwoman of Vancouver band Chains of Love, head of Manimal PR, and fine artist (a.k.a. TIT), it’s fair to say this is one hastily swimming shark. Following the release of Chains of Love’s Misery Makers Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 and a hectic period of touring, Pizarro is taking a well-deserved break from life on the road. In the meantime, she’s adding more creative pursuits to her already long list of projects – one of which is art. “It’s something I started doing again because I wasn’t really playing music or performing, which is such a huge part of my life. I decided to find a way to channel my creativity in a different way.” Pizarro’s “day job” is running the PR division at Manimal, the LA-based record label behind artists like Warpaint and Bat for Lashes. It’s something she loves doing, not only because it’s a way to stay connected to the music industry, but it’s also made her into a more “gracious” artist. For a woman so overflowing with creativity, it’s hard to imagine Pizarro

MORE