Mac Demarco

Mac Demarco

  For a guy that’s been tagged as being the face of the so-called “slacker-rock” genre, you’d be hard pressed to find someone that’s spent more time working on their craft than Mac DeMa...

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Thundercat

Thundercat is everywhere. If you have even a passing interest in boundary-pushing rap and R&B, you’ve probably found yourself floating through his orbit. Born Stephen Bruner, he is the son of Ronald Bruner, Sr., a drummer who played with Diana Ross and the Temptations. Bruner’s career has featured him writing, performing and recording with a diverse group of notable musicians including Herbie Hancock, Erykah Badu, George Clinton, and Suicidal Tendencies. More than a hired gun, he’s developed his own sonic persona, starting with his collaborations with Flying Lotus and then coming into full view on his two blistering solo slabs of jazz fusion: 2011’s The Golden Age of Apocalypse and 2013’s Apocalypse. He returned this year with a surprisingly deep mini-album called The Beyond / Where the Giants Roam. Bruner’s sonic DNA is intrinsic to the fabric of Kendrick Lamar’s iconoclastic statement To Pimp A Butterfly. His ebullient bass playing is prominently featured across the album, along with production credits on “Wesley’s Theory”, “Hood Politics” and “Complexion (A Zulu Love)”. His extensive involvement also put him in a position to see one of today’s greatest artists at the height of his powers from close-up. “Kendrick is such a dynamic person,

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Juha Arvid Helminen

Since 2008 the Finnish photographer Juha Arvid Helminen has been exploring humanity’s literal and metaphorical dark side with a photo series entitled The Invisible Empire, which explores the ways in which power, authority, and violence express themselves through fashion and visual iconography. Helminen dresses his subjects in uniforms and accessories which suggest fascist and authoritarian political movements, conservative religion and contemporary policing. “I have always been fascinated by uniforms, and when I had studied arts and photography for a few years in 2008 I wanted to create photos with a meaning. To be honest, at first I was only intrigued by the aesthetics, but a bit later I started to think about human behaviour and how we convey different ideologies and professions by our clothes – how traditions and beliefs dictate our behaviour. How we hide our true persona and create walls around us.” This name, ‘Invisible Empire’, was on my mind for many years. Little by little just a few photographs grew into a whole narrative of humans’ incapability to learn from its mistakes throughout many centuries. The title, Invisible Empire, refers to an alternative name used by the Ku Klux Klan, an organization “known for violence, racism and

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MAGAZINE FEATURE

Calvin Love

  Edmonton native, Calvin Love, is taking listeners along a journey of self-discovery with the recent release of Super Future – his first album under the esteemed indie label, Arts & Crafts, and his second to date. Featuring themes of love, loss, frustration and nostalgia, the album’s title befits its distinctly celestial sound – think dream-like synths and textured melodies underscored by funky bass lines and upbeat drums. Like 2012’s New Radar, Love wrote and recorded Super Future entirely by himself, only bringing in outside help for mixing. As a self-professed “control freak”, the solitary recording process is something that works well for Love. “I’ve played in bands before and I like collaborating, but I just kind of needed to prove to myself that I could do it all on my own – and it’s nice to be the only one calling the shots.” I’ve played in bands before and I like collaborating, but I just kind of needed to prove to myself that I could do it all on my own – and it’s nice to be the only one calling the shots. But despite the similar recording process, Super Future is a markedly more optimistic effort than New

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Stacey Mckenzie

There’s only a handful of black models that have hit the runways and become household names in the West, but Stacey McKenzie is not just a black model – she’s a veteran Canadian supermodel who has upheld notions of beauty often ignored by the complex and sometimes monotone modeling industry. Beyond her tall, lean stature, McKenzie stands out with a crown of natural blonde curls and freckles. “When I started my career, it is true that there was only a handful of black models on the international scene in high fashion,” she says. “Transitioning into today, I do not see much of a change overall in the industry,” she carries on. “Because of my lighter skin complexion, freckles and natural blonde hair, there was no category that I fit into. It wasn’t until Jean Paul Gaultier booked me when I became a symbol of a new and very unique category, which ultimately led to my success.” However, regardless of her successes, the modeling playing field is still a jagged journey for models of colour. “When a designer such as Junya Watanabe chooses no black models for a collection based off varying African cultures, it doesn’t surprise me. Fashion is a

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